garden project page_________________

 



a 9,000 square foot
heritage and heirloom food garden

has been built directly behind the tennis courts

at the Princess Elizabeth Elementary School - PEES


Phase 1 of this project was DONE in June 2012 thanks to numerous Volunteers and numerous Sponsors.



 

FALL 2013-

Phase 2A

The Community Garden Project


We will be celebrating the closing of the garden season with The Stone Soup Harvest Celebration that will be held on Tuesday October 29th at lunch hour. This celebration is to honor our donors and volunteers who make possible the bounty that the garden provides for our students.

The celebration is named after the book “Stone Soup”. After the students harvest

the remainder of vegetables from the garden, each child is also asked to bring a vegetable from home to place in the soup just like the town's people from the Stone Soup Story. (Don't worry there actually won't be any stones in the soup) 

Local chef Didier Desjardin has volunteered to head up a small group of volunteers to prepare the soup for the entire school, volunteers and donors. Thank you Didier!

 

 

A Special thank you to the Toronto Dominion Bank for their generous contribution of $4,000.00 that made it possible to purchase the garden shed and composting bins that will arrive soon.

THANK YOU TD Bank from all of us at Princess Elizabeth Elementary School.

 

 

 

 

Anyone out there want to join The (working) Garden Committee?

Call Pervana: 819-238-1285

 
 

Anyone out there want to join The (working) Garden Committee?

Call Pervana: 819-238-1285

 


 

 

 SPRING
2013-

Phase 2

We are now preparing for Phase 2 of the project, which includes:


building a 24' x 28' outdoor classroom/picnic area with a raised floor and a solid roof that will allow us to collect rainwater,

increasing the number of beds, both raised and in-ground, to accommodate the waiting list of interested community members,

installing an irrigation system to bring tap water from the school to 3 outlets in the garden,

planting kiwi vines along the fence,

purchasing more heritage seeds and

purchasing a storage shed.


Anyone out there want to join The (working) Garden Committee?


Call Pervana: 819-238-1285

 
 

Anyone out there want to join The (working) Garden Committee?

Call Pervana: 819-238-1285

 


 


 

School gardens are a wonderful way to use the schoolyard as a classroom, reconnect students with the natural world and the true source of their food, and teach them valuable gardening and agriculture concepts and skills that integrate with several subjects, such as math, science, art, health and physical education, and social studies, as well as several educational goals, including personal and social responsibility. We can also teach them about the environment and about recycling, composting and water conservation.


 

More than just a teaching tool, this Food Garden will become a portal through which knowledge of nature will be passed from one generation to another. It will also engender a sense of belonging to a community and working together for a common goal. Together participants will exchange knowledge and create a bond between our school and the community. This provides an opportunity for the students to connect with nature, take responsibility for our community, learn about the importance of healthy eating, and ultimately achieve a healthy vibrant community lifestyle.


 

 


 

PROJECT
SUMMARY

IN 140 WORDS

9,000 square feet of land has been set aside on school property to build a fenced-in, experiential learning garden to grow  organic vegetables, berries, fruit, flowers, fruit trees, vines, shrubs and herbs in phases. 



Using the ‘Patterns Through the Seasons’ guidebook and consulting with Concordia University and a Montreal Gardens group, our garden planning committee comprised of 4 teachers, 4 seniors, 2 students and the CLC coordinator,  will provide teacher support for our entire faculty to enhance curriculum.



Art class will also be involved in providing signs, stakes, sculptures etc. Teachers and students supported by more local volunteer gardeners will spend at least 45 minutes per week working in the garden.



Magog’s Summer Camp will care for the summer garden. Students will also be involved with introducing a farmers market for our community to inject an entrepreneurial side to this project



LAYOUT
OF THE
FOOD
GARDEN

SHOWING
SEVERAL
RAISED
BEDS

AND OTHER
PLANTATIONS






Each bed will contain several food
types:  just 2
examples
are shown
here at the
far right.

 
Bed 1
Tomato
Eggplant
Leeks
Kale
Swiss chard and/or Collards
Basil
Parsley
Beets
 
2
Tomato
Peppers
Onions (plant in the middle of the bed)
Parsnip (middle)
Basil
Swiss chard

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Of course the site will be managed through all the seasons and covering all the needs for proper maintenance and improvement.





"How" each of
responsabilities
is to be
carried out
has also
been
planned
Site
Management
Schedule

continued

showing
all the
seasons.
 

Role
of
the
Garden
Advocate
 
Garden
Advocate
Role:

continued
  E
BUDGET The source of
funding
needs to
be 100%
from
Sponsors

 

We are now preparing for Phase 2 of the project, which includes:

building a 24' x 28' outdoor classroom/picnic area with a raised floor and a solid roof that will allow us to collect rainwater,

increasing the number of beds, both raised and in-ground, to accommodate the waiting list of interested community members,

installing an irrigation system to bring tap water from the school to 3 outlets in the garden,

planting kiwi vines along the fence,

purchasing more heritage seeds and

purchasing a storage shed.

Anyone out there want to join The (working) Garden Committee?

Call Pervana: 819-238-1285

 
 

   

School gardens are a wonderful way to use the schoolyard as a classroom, reconnect students with the natural world and the true source of their food, and teach them valuable gardening and agriculture concepts and skills that integrate with several subjects, such as math, science, art, health and physical education, and social studies, as well as several educational goals, including personal and social responsibility. We can also teach them about the environment and about recycling, composting and water conservation.


 

More than just a teaching tool, this Food Garden will become a portal through which knowledge of nature will be passed from one generation to another. It will also engender a sense of belonging to a community and working together for a common goal. Together participants will exchange knowledge and create a bond between our school and the community. This provides an opportunity for the students to connect with nature, take responsibility for our community, learn about the importance of healthy eating, and ultimately achieve a healthy vibrant community lifestyle